Build Your Own Wreath using the Plastic Wrap Method

By Adult Education, Crafts, Nature No Comments

Here is a fun and simple way to make a wreath without having to do a bunch of wiring!  This style of wreath is also very easy to re-use with fresh greens. We taught this method at our wreath class in 2019 at the Bellevue Botanical Garden and it worked out really well. We had a family at the wreath class and the child who was about 8 years old was able to make a wreath as well.  We would…

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Haunted By That Day

By Bellevue Botanical Garden No Comments

The following post was part of a larger article in the Arnoldia Journal from the Arnold Arboretum about the impact of COVID-19 on botanical gardens. To see the complete article, go HERE. Haunted By That Day By Nancy Kartes, Garden Manager On January 21, 2020, our nation’s first case of COVID-19 was reported in the Seattle area, just a few miles from Bellevue Botanical Garden. I was not paying attention to the news. As garden manager, I was deep into…

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Leaves in our Lives: A Living Lab Historical Perspective

By Nature, Youth Education One Comment

Leaves in our Lives: A Living Lab Historical Perspective By Barb Williams, former manager of the Living Lab Program In the Pacific Northwest, deciduous and evergreen leaves are an integral part of our lives. They provide shade, oxygen, shelter, scientific discoveries, art forms, nesting materials for animals, a symphony of sound and so much more. For these reasons I chose leaves as the topic for the first activity that I developed in 1999 as the new Manager of the Bellevue…

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Wanted: Garden Escapee, English Ivy

By Adult Education, Gardening, Nature One Comment

Wanted: Garden Escapee, English Ivy By Angela DiLorenzo   English Ivy (Hedera helix) garners oohs and ahhs clinging to the sides of English cottages and adorning arbors. However, in our Northwest coast forests and parklands, it is a menace. Ivy draws us in with its lovely trailing vines and evergreen properties. We eagerly purchase hanging pots and planters full of lovely variegated vines to beautify our homes. Eventually, the annuals die, and perennials over grow their pots. A convenient backyard…

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Neighborhood Nature Walk

By Nature, Youth Education No Comments

Neighborhood Nature Walk By Angela DiLorenzo I’ve seen many families out walking during the pandemic. It has been nice to see bikes and scooters on the streets and pathways of our neighborhoods and parks. As the weather improves, we are pulled outside. Consider taking a nature walk in your own neighborhood. I know we are separated from our Bellevue Botanical Garden programs, docents, and other nature professionals, but you can still enjoy the forested parts of our city. An after-breakfast…

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Shadow Picture

By Nature, Youth Education One Comment

Shadow Picture By Marcy Reynolds As we approach the summer solstice, daylight is shining longer each day, giving us lots of chances to play in the sun. One activity I enjoy on a sunny afternoon is making a shadow picture outside. All you need is pencil or pen and a piece of paper. Take a walk at the Garden or in your neighborhood Find a shadow you like. Put a piece of paper on the sidewalk Draw a line along…

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Why Are New Leaves a Lighter Color?

By Nature, Youth Education One Comment

Why Are New Leaves a Lighter Color? By Marcy Reynolds Spring is a time of new growth at the Garden. While dazzling displays of colorful flowers easily catch the eye, I love seeing so many different shades of green on the trees and shrubs. Some of them almost look like they are glowing green! But why? With more sunshine and rain, plants grow, but why is the new growth light in color, while the existing leaves or needles look darker?…

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Exploring the Texture of Trees

By Nature, Youth Education One Comment

Exploring the Texture of Trees By Kate Sorensen Now is a great time to head outside to observe the textures found in nature. Some questions to think about while you are exploring include: How would you describe the tree bark that you find? Is it thick or thin? Smooth or rough? Does the tree have leaves (deciduous) or needles (coniferous)? How do they feel? Compare an old leaf to a new leaf. Do they feel different? What part of the…

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How Does Your Garden Grow?

By Gardening, Nature, Youth Education One Comment

By Kate Sorensen As I was wandering around the Flower and Garden Festival a couple of years ago, there was a booth for kids to make a plant pot out of newspaper. It was really easy and ingenious! So, I went looking online for directions to share with you. You just need newspaper and a bottle or jar with a concave bottom. Read more here. The Spruce website has some great container garden projects that kids will love. Link includes:…

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Spring Has Sprung!

By Youth Education No Comments

Spring has sprung! By Kate Sorensen Now is a great time to look at the growth of plants as we head into the growing season. I’ve started to take photos of our Gunnera tinctoria plants at the Garden (pictured above). They grow so fast! They look like giant rhubarb, but the plants are not related to each other. If you are visiting the Garden, you can find the plants by the Aaron Education Center and office entrance in the Rain…

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